Elinore Schnurr

Art Collection Recent Paintings

Bio Artist Statement

Ommonia Cafe
Omonia Elinore Schnurr

New York Art World ® - Artists - Schnurr - Next Artist - Back

Elinore Schnurr is a figurative painter, loosely tied to the realist tradition.


"I have been working on a series of paintings these past couple of years in and around Times Square having to do with reflections at night; the paintings are involved with the juxtaposition of real figures and space within a bar or cafe as seen through the window, looking in from the street, with the reflected images on the glass of the posters and media images of the street. This juxtaposition fractures the figures and space within. The overall message is of a certain existential loneliness."


Elinore's studio is once again in Long Island City, NY. Her paintings are in many museum collections such as The Cleveland Museum and the National Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C. She has work in more than 50 corporate collections and many important private collections in this country and abroad.

Elinore tells us that "I learned how to paint at the age of ten from my father's cousin, Lloyd Weninger. He taught stage design at Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie Mellon) and was a splendid watercolor painter.

He returned to his studio in my hometown of Sandusky, Ohio during the summers, and I would go there and paint; he had all the right brushes and professional paints."

Elinore went on to receive a BFA degree from the Cleveland Institute of Art and has painted nearly every day since.

"The interiors of public places in New York City, from intimate bars to cavernous hotel lobbies, have been the focus of a series of atmospheric paintings by Elinore Schnurr, who is intrigued by how such defined enclosures influence the interactions of their random occupants.

Often posing as a patron of the setting she intends to paint, Schnurr records her initial impressions as small, on-the-spot watercolors that register structural environment, tonal relationships within the space, and the imprint of figures coming into and out of her visual field.

She also makes careful color notes of the controlled lighting that heightens the drama of exchange between such spaces and people passing through them. These sketches inform compositions further developed on canvas in her Long Island City studio."

The above quote is from "Painting the Town: Cityscapes of New York," published by the Museum of the City of New York and Yale University Press.

When Elinore travels, she carries her pocade box in her backpack. The pochade box is a small self-contained paint box with built-in easel.

In the late spring of 2000, she roamed Tuscany, near Lucca, and captured the ambiance of several cafes.

Elinore Schnurr made a lot of paintings on location; occasionally, a patron would request that he or she be included in the painting. This led to many casual portraits on commission.

Elinore Schnurr also painted Tuscan architectural subjects in the same neighborhood.

"Each place endears one ot its own quiet beauty; after several hours of intense concentration, I walk away with the imprint of a magical experience in my hand."


THE PORTRAIT

"A portrait, to me, is a dialogue between the sitter and myself, the artist.

I seek, step by step, to capture the sitter in visual terms, a sort of magical procedure whereby various aspects of the sitter reveal themselves and are captured as the portrait moves along.

"I came to make portraits through the discipline of figurative painting. My strength in portraiture lies in merging the painterly qualities of composition, mass, color and line with the ability to capture a likeness. "

Except for single head portraits, I prefer to work on location in the place of the subject's choosing, usually in the subject's home.

I usually start with a photo session to determine the best pose and location; photographs are especially useful when dealing with groups. Color studies and life sittings may take place as the painting moves along.

Live sittings depend on the client's time and access.

I take the painting as far as I can to finish, share it with the client and make any adjustments that are necessary."

Prices vary with size, type of portrait (three-quarter, full body, etc.), number of people involved.


NEW YORK INTERIORS

"The interiors of public places in New York City, from intimate bars to cavernous hotel lobbies, have been the focus of a series of atmospheric paintings by Elinore Schnurr, who is intrigued by how such defined enclosures influence the interactions of their random occupants.

Often posing as a patron of the setting she intends to paint, Schnurr records her initial impressions as small, on-the-spot watercolors that register structural environment, tonal relationships within the space, and the imprint of figures coming into and out of her visual field.

She also makes careful color notes of the controlled lighting that heightens the drama of exchange between such spaces and people passing through them. These sketches inform compositions further developed on canvas in her Long Island City studio."

The above quote is from "Painting the Town: Cityscapes of New York," published by the Museum of the City of New York and Yale University Press.

TUSCANY

When Elinore travels, she carries her pocade box in her backpack. The pochade box is a small self-contained paint box with built-in easel.

In the late spring of 2000, she roamed Tuscany, near Lucca, and captured the ambiance of several cafes.

Elinore Schnurr made a lot of paintings on location; occasionally, a patron would request that he or she be included in the painting. This led to many casual portraits on commission.

Elinore Schnurr also painted Tuscan architectural subjects in the same neighborhood.

"Each place endears one ot its own quiet beauty; after several hours of intense concentration, I walk away with the imprint of a magical experience in my hand."


TIMES SQUARE

"I have been working on a series of paintings these past couple of years in and around Times Square having to do with reflections at night; the paintings are involved with the juxtaposition of real figures and space within a bar or cafe as seen through the window, looking in from the street, with the reflected images on the glass of the posters and media images of the street. This juxtaposition fractures the figures and space within. The overall message is of a certain existential loneliness."


LONG ISLAND CITY - NYC

Elinore's studio is once again in Long Island City NY. Her paintings are in many museum collections such as The Cleveland Museum and the National Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C.; she has work in more than 50 corporate collections and many important private collections in this country and abroad.

Elinore tells us that "I learned how to paint at the age of ten from my father's cousin, Lloyd Weninger. He taught stage design at Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie Mellon) and was a splendid watercolor painter.

He returned to his studio in my hometown of Sandusky, Ohio during the summers, and I would go there and paint; he had all the right brushes and professional paints."

Elinore went on to receive a BFA degree from the Cleveland Institute of Art and has painted nearly every day since.


DIALOGUE

"A portrait, to me, is a dialogue between the sitter and myself, the artist. I seek, step by step, to capture the sitter in visual terms, a sort of magical procedure whereby various aspects of the sitter reveal themselves and are captured as the portrait moves along. "I came to make portraits through the discipline of figurative painting. My strength in portraiture lies in merging the painterly qualities of composition, mass, color and line with the ability to capture a likeness. "Except for single head portraits, I prefer to work on location in the place of the subject's choosing, usually in the subject's home. I usually start with a photo session to determine the best pose and location; photographs are especially useful when dealing with groups. Color studies and life sittings may take place as the painting moves along. Live sittings depend on the client's time and access. I take the painting as far as I can to finish, share it with the client and make any adjustments that are necessary." Prices vary with size, type of portrait (three-quarter, full body, etc.), number of people involved.

- Elinore Schnurr - August Rush - Grand Central Terminal
4540 Center Blvd, L.I.C.
On View: Commissioned Art Permanent Location

 


Please click on the first letter of the artist's last name of the artist you wish to preview

A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M  

N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z  

Click on ORDER FORM for Inquiries - PAYMENT OPTIONS for Art Purchase

All artwork is copyright of the respective owner or artist. All other material 2016 New York Art World ®. All Rights Reserved

Elinore Schnurr Collection - Continue with Next Artist

 

New York Art World ® - Back To Top